To simplify your task of setting up and running a business model project this book chunk offers you some useful guidelines that tie all the previous content pieces and tools in this book together.

Enjoy the book chunk and make sure to give us your feedback!

This book chunk is open for comments only during 48 hours, in order to meet our tight publishing schedule and send you the book in time. We need to revise it and ship it to Alan Clark for editing. Then Alan will take care of design. All in all a time-consuming and intensive process.

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Hmm, good question. However, to a certain extent it's indeed a bit "academic". From a practitioner's perspective what really matters is: will the new business model give me a (sustainable) competitive advantage in a certain business environment.

I would define it as simple as "coming up with new ways of doing business".
This is very well crafted.

On page 4, in the section on Design Attitude, I wonder if you can add that the design attitude is one where both 'planned' and 'emergent' ideas merge into a better propostion (borrowing from Mintzberg that both ends of the continuum come into play and not just one!)

The imagery of untangling a ball of wool on page 6 is powerful!
Could you elaborate a little on what you understand with "emergent" versus "planned"? Examples?
This can be found in Mintzberg's 5Ps of strategy, and also includes "realized"
Cheenu, I don't think the design attitude excludes the integration of any "planned" ideas. It is more about finding the ideal solution from all the pieces available. These may be planned or emergent.
This is very well crafted.

On page 4, in the section on Design Attitude, I wonder if you can add that the design attitude is one where both 'planned' and 'emergent' ideas merge into a better propostion (borrowing from Mintzberg that both ends of the continuum come into play and not just one!)

The imagery of untangling a ball of wool on page 6 is powerful!
Wow! Good chunk!

Maybe you could mention the need for business model design creativity to be tied to or aligned with product design creativity in order to boost the productivity of product R&D.

In established companies, there are often ample physical "product ideas" that never get serious consideration because they don't immediately fit the prevailing business model. Model design is something left to strategists at the top (and later in the process trickled down through the marketing department) once product design has been approved, while product design resides within product groups. Part of the "prevent taming of bold ideas" bit?
Very, very, very good point!

I will actually add it to the very beginning of the book. Fits better there than in the design process. And hop, it's in my overall to-add/do-list for the book ;-)

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